Lawrence Sims Bartell obituary photo
 
In Memory of

Lawrence Sims Bartell

February 23, 1923 - September 8, 2017

Obituary


Lawrence S. Bartell passed away Friday, September 8, 2017 at the age of 94. He was born February 23, 1923 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. After his graduation with distinction and honors in chemistry from the University of Michigan, during World War II he began work on the Manhattan Project at the University of Chicago where he tested methods to extract plutonium from the uranium slugs irradiated in a nuclear reactor. When he was drafted in the US Navy in 1945 he became a radio technician. After his discharge from the navy he received his Ph.D....

Lawrence S. Bartell passed away Friday, September 8, 2017 at the age of 94. He was born February 23, 1923 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. After his graduation with distinction and honors in chemistry from the University of Michigan, during World War II he began work on the Manhattan Project at the University of Chicago where he tested methods to extract plutonium from the uranium slugs irradiated in a nuclear reactor. When he was drafted in the US Navy in 1945 he became a radio technician. After his discharge from the navy he received his Ph.D. degree in physical chemistry from the University of Michigan. Following his marriage to Joy Keer in 1952 he joined the faculty of Iowa State University where he taught for 12 years before returning to the University of Michigan. His research on the structure of molecules led to appointments on editorial boards of several international journals, to the chairmanship of the Commission on Electron Diffraction of the International Union of Crystallography, to the chairmanship of the Division of Chemical Physics of the American Physical Society, to Fellowships in the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, to service on the Petroleum Research Fund Advisory Board of the American Chemical Society and procedure to reconstruct holographic images of atoms and molecules successfully realized the original goal of Nobel Laureate Denis Gabor, inventor of holography, namely to use electron waves to attain unprecedented resolving power in images of matter. It led to his inclusion in the 17th addition of the Guinness Book of Records for the "World's most powerful microscope." He received a Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award from the University of Michigan, a Distinguished Faculty Award from the Michigan Association of Governing Boards, the Creativity Award from the National Science Foundation, and a Teaching Award from the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts of the University of Michigan. He was named Michigan Scientist of the year in 1986, and was awarded the Philp J. Elving Collegiate Chair in the department of Chemistry in 1987. Following his formal retirement from teaching in 1993, he continued to lead a research group at the university. In 2004 he received the Metz-Starck international award for the research on the structure of molecules. In addition to his service on boards of various journals and societies, he was appointed to Visiting Professorships in a number of Universities including Moscow State University in Moscow, Russia and the University of Paris XI in Orsay, France. He was also an industrial consultant for several corporations and lectured at numerous universities and organizations. He is survived by his son, Michael, of Atlanta, Georgia

A memorial gathering will take place Noon to 4:00pm Monday, September 18, 2017 at Muehlig Funeral Chapel, 403 S. Fourth Avenue, Ann Arbor MI. In lieu of flowers Memorial contributions may be made in Lawrence's name to any Veterans organizations, environmental groups of your choosing or to the University of Michigan Department of Chemistry.