Pamela Jeanne Puntenney obituary photo
 
In Memory of

Pamela Jeanne Puntenney

December 29, 1945 - June 10, 2017

Obituary


Pam Puntenney died at her home, with her husband Alan McWaters by her side, following a valiant and often very private battle with cancer.
A native of Kansas, Pam was born in 1945 to Mary and Delbert Puntenney. After receiving a bachelor's degree from Wichita State University, she went on to earn an M.A. in psychology from the University of Kansas. She worked as an elementary school teacher for four years, first in Shawnee Mission, Kansas, and later in Bennington, Vermont. It was in Vermont that she met and married the love of her life,...

Pam Puntenney died at her home, with her husband Alan McWaters by her side, following a valiant and often very private battle with cancer.
A native of Kansas, Pam was born in 1945 to Mary and Delbert Puntenney. After receiving a bachelor's degree from Wichita State University, she went on to earn an M.A. in psychology from the University of Kansas. She worked as an elementary school teacher for four years, first in Shawnee Mission, Kansas, and later in Bennington, Vermont. It was in Vermont that she met and married the love of her life, Alan McWaters. In 1975, the two relocated to Ann Arbor, where Pam pursued advanced degrees at the University of Michigan, earning both an M.S. and a Ph.D. In 1984, Pam's entrepreneurial spirit and independent vision inspired her to launch Environmental and Human Systems Management, a consulting firm that assisted organizations worldwide in addressing environmental issues. Over the years, she accumulated an impressive client list that included the United Nations and the World Bank. Along with her global work in environmental policy, Pam published and presented articles and reports for the U.N., the World Bank, the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, and the World Summit on Sustainable Development. Her most recent public lectures included presentations in locales ranging from Abu Dhabi to South Africa, Indonesia, South Korea, New York, and Colorado. In addition to serving as associate editor of The Applied Anthropologist, she was a delegate to the U.N. Commission on Sustainable Development, where she headed up the Climate Change Delegation, and co-chaired the Education Caucus of the U.N. Committee for Sustainable Development. Until the time of her death, Pam served on the advisory boards of organizations that included the World Environmental Education Congress, the Worldview Impact Foundation, and the Stakeholder Forum for a Sustainable Future. She devoted her precious free time to an array of hobbies and pursuits, among them gardening, traveling, reading, and enjoying the company of her much-loved dogs and pet birds. Pam is survived by her sisters Jennifer and Andrea (Austin), her brothers Peter and Patrick, by nieces Kimberly Beasly and Marsha Rodwin, and by nephews Arron Kurjan and Brice Puntenney. She was preceded in death by her parents and her beloved grandmother, Violet Quinn. Pam will be missed by many people, for many reasons. Friends and family will mourn the loss of her gentle presence, her wisdom and ready counsel, her unfailing kindness and support, her insights, and her quiet but often pointed Kansas humor. Her colleagues worldwide will miss her expertise in environmental policy, her collaborative spirit and cooperative skills, and her passionate and tireless advocacy on behalf of the planet. A celebration and remembrance of Pam's life will be held later this summer. Donations
in Pam's memory may be made to World Wildlife Fund (https://www.worldwildlife.org/) or The Basset Hound Rescue of Michigan (https://www.worldwildlife.org/). Friends and colleagues are invited to sign Pam's guest book on line at Muehlig Funeral Chapel (http://www.dignitymemorial.com/muehlig-funeral-chapel/en-us/index.page).